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Monthly Archives: September 2013

In August, the Health and Human Services Commission of Texas published a report on their website. This report is an external quality review that was performed on STAR+PLUS home and community-based services. This is an extremely important and timely report because of the passage of Senate Bill 7 in the 2013 Texas Legislature, which will gradually shift the waiver services for individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD) over to managed care (i.e. STAR+PLUS). First, the full report can be accessed at: http://www.hhsc.state.tx.us/reports/2013/EQRO-STAR-PLUS-Waiver.pdf

This report was developed via a combination of surveying individual service plans (ISPs), telephone surveys, and face-to-face interviews. For the telephone surveys and face-to-face interviews, individuals whose ISP was studied were contacted. Of the 1207 people eligible, 202 returned surveys. Of those 202, 23 people from the Harris County area were interviewed in the face-to-face interviews.

The results are interesting:
• Almost 93% receive services at home.
• Almost 68% of members live with their families, almost 20% live alone, 10% live in an assisted living facility.
• The most used services are personal assistant services (95%), emergency response services (90%), and respite care (57%). The least used services are minor home modification (2.6%), meals (almost 4%), and dental services (4%).
• 28% of the members have some college education, a degree, or more than a college degree. 42% have a high school education or lower.
• 91% of the respondents have a caregiver that helps them with daily activities. 16% of those caregivers are unpaid family volunteers.
• The top five reasons for needing a caregiver include health, assistance looking after themselves, assistance with nutrition, assistance getting around, and assistance with daily activities.
• Almost 80% of the respondents identify their health as being fair or poor. Only 6.5% identified excellent or very good for their health.
• 67% of the respondents have moderate-to-high depressive sympotomatology.

The survey also looks at the service coordinators and the ISP:
• 84% of the respondents were satisfied or very satisfied with the help they received from their service coordinator in the past six months.
• Almost three quarters of respondents were included in the decision-making process of their ISP, were included in decisions about services, felt their ISP was respondent to their needs, and felt that their plan included services that were important to them.

In the face-to-face interviews, participants were asked about positive and negative experiences. The following negative experiences were reported by 31-45% of those people interviewed: poor communications, delays in care/services, poor phone experience, red tape, poor quality transportation, poor quality dental care, and poor communication with doctors.

Each service coordinator reported caseloads of 200-500 cases, per coordinator.

The study makes a number of recommendations:
• There should be more stringent standards regarding the frequency and methods of contact between service coordinators and members.
• There should be a reduction in caseloads of service coordinators (which will also allow for more frequent contact).
• Existing protocols for contracting with home health care, transportation, and other types of vendors should be evaluated to ensure high-quality service.
• There should be a vendor certification process to assist with quality.

The population studied includes Medicaid and some Medicare-eligible individuals. They may or may not have IDD. This is, however, very interesting as it may help map out potential concerns for the implementation of SB7. Concerns include service coordinator caseloads, depression, communications, delays in care/services, red tape, and some quality control issues.

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