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Monthly Archives: May 2014

State agencies in Texas are required to go through a review process (called the Sunset Review) to determine if they are still needed and to look at the agency’s performance. In general this occurs every 12 years. Currently, the Health and Human Services agencies in Texas are undergoing this process. This post deals with the Sunset Review’s report on the Department of Aging and Disability Services (DADS). This is not meant to be a comprehensive summary of the report, in fact you can access the report below:
https://www.sunset.texas.gov/public/uploads/files/reports/DADS%20Staff%20Report.pdf

DADS provides most of the long-term care and support for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

This post is going to deal with the following recommendations of the report:
• The state supported living centers
• Transitioning from state supported living centers to the community
• Ensuring adequate care in the community
• Enforcing violations
• Contract management

State Supported Living Centers (SSLCs):
SSLC residents account for less than 1% of the agency’s clients but represent 10% of DADS’ budget and 80% of its workforce. As of September 2013 there were 3649 residents and 13,906 staff being funded by almost $563 million. The report reviewed some of the issues with the SSLCs:
• No SSLC is in compliance with the Department of Justice settlement agreements from 2009. The SSLC range from being in compliance with 18% of the requirements (Richmond) to 40% (Lubbock).
• The number of confirmed allegations of abuse, neglect, and exploitation at SSLCs is shocking and in 2013 represented 15% of the population of the SSLCs.
• In 2002, the SSLC population was a little over 5,000 residents with a funding around $300 million. In 2013 that population was 3649 with appropriations coming close to $700 million.
• All of the SSLCS, except one, require infrastructure repairs that will cost more than the SSLCs are valued at. Only Denton is valued at more than the cost of its infrastructure repairs.
• Almost 10% of SSLC employees are injured annually.
• The average monthly cost for serving a resident of an SSLC is approximately $9500 than a community option.

As a result of the above, the Sunset Review report recommends the following:
• Close Austin SSLC by August 31, 2017
• Establish a closure commission to evaluate the SSLCs and determine five more to close
• Close five more SSLCs by August 31, 2022

Transitioning from SSLCs to the community:
The report notes that many individuals in SSLCs have complex behavioral, mental health, and medical issues. With that in mind, certain supports need to be in place to successfully move them from a SSLC to the community. As a result, the report recommends:
• Requiring DADS to establish crisis intervention teams statewide
• Require DADS (and HHSC) to reimburse services appropriately so that providers will open group homes to people with high medical needs
• Allow SSLCs to provide services to community clients

Ensuring adequate care in day habitat facilities:
This recommendation affects almost 35,000 individuals in community settings. The report finds that DADS doesn’t really monitor day habitat facilities and that the agency’s rules vary across program so there are no quality or safety standards. As a result, the report recommends:
• DADS develop basic safety and service requirements for community based programs. The report suggests things like running fire drills, running background checks on employees, following the client’s plan, etc.
• Require that abuse, neglect, and exploitation be tracked.
• Track data on services offered and deficiencies.

Enforce violations:
In fiscal year 2013, DADS took enforcement actions on only 225 out of 38,000 confirmed violations of state regulations, federal regulations, and Medicaid contracts. Among other issues, DADS has inadequate penalties to deter violations, has difficulty collecting them, and has a serious backlog in cases. The report recommends:
• Develop progressive sanctions for serious or repeated violations
• Repeal the “right to correct” provisions for providers and require DADS to define the criteria for their appropriate use.
• Authorize higher financial penalties to incentivize compliance.

Contract management:
DADS’s approach to managing contracts is fragmented which results in a lack of information, accountability, and inefficiency. This also creates cost over runs and project delays. The report recommends:
• Require DADS to consolidate all contract management
• Have the centralized contract management review and approve contract planning during the early stages of the procurement process
• Develop policies for the risk-based monitoring of contracts

Taken together, the findings and recommendations show you just how bad things are for individuals with IDD in Texas. The SSLCs are bad, the community settings are better but are unregulated and have little incentive to prevent/address deficiencies, and the agency has challenges with oversight and protecting/serving individuals with IDD. This report comes out while we’re transitioning people with IDD to managed care and it is chilling to think how much worse things can get under that system if they are already this bad.

The report provides some opportunities, however. First, realize that just because it is in the report does not mean that the state is going to act on it. This means contacting your legislator and dragging them, kicking and screaming, towards supporting its implementation. Second, the advocacy groups should be aligning some of their legislative foci around these recommendations. This way the Legislature hears the same thing from everyone. Third, SB7 (managed care) is only legislation, it is only a law. This means it can be changed via legislation. Maybe it’s time to get the Legislature to revisit it, slow it down even more, or even kill it in the upcoming session.