Skip navigation

Tag Archives: MDCP

The Department of Aging and Disability Services has published its Legislative Appropriations Request (LAR) for the 2016/2017 biennium. The full report can be found here: http://cfoweb.dads.state.tx.us/lar/default.asp .

The LAR is the important first step in the state’s budgeting process. This represents the agency’s priorities and wish list. The Legislature will factor some of this in when determining the agency’s budget. This is important because these dollars, while large, represent services to people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The table below shows what was budgeted for the 2014 and 2015 biennium compared to what the agency is asking for in the 2016/2017 biennium. Keep in mind that Texas budgets according to two year cycles, so 2014/2015 represents the combined budget of both years as does 2016/2017. The column at the end shows you the change. A positive number means that the agency is asking for more, a negative number indicates they are asking for less, and a zero means essentially no change.

The breakdown of the LAR can be found here: dadslar

As requested by DADS, there are major changes to the funding of community based alternatives, primary home care, and SSLC capital repairs/renovations. DADS is requesting increases in hospice, guardianship, community attendant services, CLASS, DBMD, regulation, administration, and IT program support.

In addition to the LAR, DADS is also requesting several exceptional items. Frequently the LAR requests by strategy represents no change to services. In other words, this is the cost for the status quo. The exceptional items represents new things the agency would like to do.

The first exception item is funding to maintain the current caseload for many of the waiver programs (HCS, CLASS, DBMD, MDCP, Texas Home Living Waiver, non-Medicaid services, and PACE). This exceptional item is asking for approximately 111 million dollars over the biennium. In their justification, DADs mentions that the current biennium (FY 2014 and 2015) had the funding to expand waiver slots, particularly in HCS, but a failure to continue funding those into the next biennium (i.e. a failure to grant this exception item) will result in people losing care.

The third exception item deals with funding to reduce waiver interest lists. If funded, this exception item would add 15,145 slots for community-based services and cost approximately 724 million dollars over the biennium. It would fully fund the STAR+PLUS community-based alternatives, the deaf-blind multiple disability lists, would serve about 20% of the people on the interest lists for HCS, MDCP, TxHmL, and CLASS. For In Home and Family Support and IDD Community services, it would serve about 10% of the people on those interest lists.

The fourth exceptional item deals with promoting independence for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). This represents a little over 85 million dollars to either move people from facilities or keep people from having to go there. If funded, it would move 500 individuals from large or medium-sized intermediate care facilities, 216 children aging out of foster care, 400 crisis slots for individuals for individuals at imminent risk of entering a large/intermediate care facility, 120 individuals with IDD in the state hospitals, and 25 for children transitioning from a general residence facility.

The fifth exceptional items seeks to enhance community IDD services for individuals with complex medical and/or behavioral needs. This is an exceptional item that is meant to address things that the Sunset Commission noted. DADS is requesting approximately 57 million dollars over the biennium to the fund new crisis respite and behavioral intervention programs, and increase the ICF and HCS rates to encourage treatment.

The seventh exceptional item relates to protecting vulnerable Texans. This item requests approximately 41 million dollars over the biennium to hire new guardianship supervisors, expand the Lifespan Respite Care program, increase the HCS cap on dental expenses to $2000 per individual per year, to provide assistance to small HCS facilities for required fire sprinkler systems, and would increase regulatory tools.

The either exception item deals with the state supported living centers. This one asks for approximately 112 million over the biennium to finance repairs and renovations, to finance a replacement plan for vehicles, and to reclassify some positions.